The Comorbidity of Diabetes and Depression among Latinas: A Literature Review

Caroline R. Quintanilla

Abstract


Diabetes remains one of the most prevalent and threatening health disparities in the United States today. Increased societal recognition of depression as a crucial facet of mental health/wellness has presupposed escalating diagnosis rates. Diabetes and depression commonly co-occur and go undetected in primary care settings. Women and Latinos/as have higher rates of either diabetes or depression than non-Hispanic Whites.
The aim of the study is to determine the role of diabetes and depression among Latinas in the United States and to determine limitations in existing literature. Expanding integrated health care systems with prevention and treatment programs for diabetes and depression is necessary. This is pertinent to Latinas because of specific factors that impact their likelihood of developing these diseases. Frequent depression screenings throughout the lifespan are warranted to monitor rates of depression. More research must be done to assess the severity of the comorbidity. Through reviewing the literature, it was found the
relationship between diabetes and depression among Latinas is bidirectional and more research is necessary to better understand this relationship, which is provoked by factors specific to the Latina lifestyle. There is a lack of research conducted on Latinas and few studies focused on this population.

Keywords


diabetes; depression; comorbidity; Latino/a

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Copyright (c) 2017 Caroline R. Quintanilla


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